Tulsi Tea with Ginger and Honey is the Perfect Drink to Cure Your Monsoon Sniffles

Does the aroma of a freshly brewed cup of tea make you delighted every morning? Well, many people all over the world would totally relate to this feeling. And to suit the tastes of every tea connoisseur, a gamut of variants are available today, the tulsi tea, being one of the most popular kinds. Tulsi tea with ginger honey?is way better than your regular cup of tea not just because it tastes great; but also because it comes loaded with various health benefits especially for the monsoon.

Beat the blue and flu

With the advent of monsoon, comes the onslaught of the common cold and fever. Nothing can be worse than feeling miserable and cold on a damp rainy day when youre already down with flu. But fret not, a quick cup of tulsi tea will bring back that fervour in you and cheer you up in an instant!

The wonderful medicinal properties of ginger honey and tulsi, in this brilliant concoction, helps improve your immunity. While ginger and honey keep you warm, tulsi helps to cure infections and inflammations. With various vital nutrients like Zinc, Selenium, Calcium, Vitamins A and C, and iron present in it, tulsi tea is more than just a normal cup of tea. And soon after drinking a hot cup of tulsi ginger honey tea, you will feel soothed and healthy.

Boost your digestive abilities

Many a time, you get to hear about people suffering from digestive problems during monsoon. It can be anything like difficulties in digestion or even loss of appetite. If you wish to treat problems like these, then drink tulsi tea with honey and ginger.

How? Well, you must already know that ginger helps in boosting digestion. Tulsi or the Holy Basil plant has been revered since time immemorial, for its healing qualities. And ages of research have already confirmed its multiple health benefits which include improving digestion. Tulsi and ginger help in the elimination of toxins from the system, which in turn boosts appetite and improves health.

What is the best time to consume tulsi tea?

You can drink a cup of ginger and honey tulsi tea at any time of the day. But make sure that you consume it in the form of a delicate brew without adding milk to it. That way it retains all its natural beneficial qualities and lets you enjoy its light aroma.

Are there any side effects?

Tulsi tea with ginger and honey doesnt have any side-effect in particular but if you are allergic to the either tulsi, honey or ginger, then its best to avoid this tea. Tulsi tea is considered safe to consume during pregnancy, but its recommended that you seek your doctors or nutritionists advice before doing so.

Now that youre aware of the benefits of tulsi tea with honey and ginger, prepare a quick hot brew for yourself and set out to beat the monsoon blues with confidence!

Top Detoxifying Benefits of Cardamom Turmeric Wellness Tea

turmeric tea online

Here comes the season of bugs!

Theres no way you havent been bitten by the sickness bug even once this season ? chances are that youve grown tired of them. Well, so have we, which is why we bring to you the perfect detoxifying concoction that will release all those nasty toxins from your body.

You mustve heard of the many detoxifying benefits of turmeric ginger honey tea. Well, this is a tried and tested spiced tea with the combination of turmeric, ginger and cardamom that works like a detoxifying wonder.

Why cardamom and turmeric?

Lets take a look at the health benefits of both spices:

Turmeric:

  • Turmeric is known for reducing internal inflammation
  • It reduces pain and helps wounds heal faster
  • It spikes your metabolism, which is why it is a good idea to have ginger honey turmeric tea on a regular basis
  • It reduces your stress levels and depression
  • It is also effective in preventing cancer
  • Diabetic patients can benefit a lot from turmeric.

Cardamom:

  • Like ginger, cardamom is also an anti-inflammatory spice
  • It does away with problems in the digestive gut
  • It has strong anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties, which makes it good for the immune system
  • The essential oils contained naturally in cardamom act as good detoxifying agents

Why you should add cardamom to your turmeric tea

Most people have turmeric tea in different capacities- the turmeric cinnamon ginger honey?tea is a favourite among fitness enthusiasts because of its taste and health benefits. Both turmeric and cardamom have similar health benefits, and together they create a potent blend.

The turmeric cardamom wellness tea is effective in cleansing and detoxifying your body like no other drink. The anti-bacterial benefits of cardamom will enable your immune system to function better and keep all those pesky diseases away.

How to make turmeric cardamom tea

Bring your tea to a boil and then add both turmeric and the cardamom seeds to the mix. Boil it for a few more minutes and then strain the drink. Drink it while it is still warm for the best benefits. Or alternatively, you could simply give TE-A-ME cardamom turmeric tea a try. For this, pour boiling or lukewarm into a cup. Dip a TE-A-ME cardamom turmeric tea bag in the cup and let it steep for a few minutes ? and voila! You could mix a few a few drops of honey if you prefer and enjoy it hot!

Possible side effects of the tea

Being made from natural spices, this tea does not have any major side effects. However, if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, its best to avoid the consumption of this tea. Both turmeric and ginger are potent ingredients that may have some effect on foetal health so pregnant women are advised against drinking this tea during pregnancy.

Reap the benefits of this extraordinary drink every day!

As a great way to detox your body, few sips of this turmeric cardamom tea daily will help you get a boost of antioxidants, improve your digestive health, nourish your body and help you to reach your health goals.

So Many Teas, So Little Time

I am, by no means, a tea expert, but being a tea lover, I always look forward to tasting various flavours and qualities. Last year, when my friend and fellow tea enthusiast, Swarup, called me up to find out if I would be interested in joining a tea tasting event in Darjeeling organised by his company, I gladly agreed. It was, in fact, too good an offer to refuse. Plus, I had to be in Kurseong the same day for a meeting. I was thrilled at the way everything fell into place!

On reaching Darjeeling, I found Swarup waiting for me. He drove to me to the processing unit and gave me a quick tour around the area. Then, we headed towards the garden where the event was taking place. With the Himalayas stretched like a canvas before the eyes, and the cool breeze sweeping over the lush tea plantation, it was a mesmerizing atmosphere, to say the least. There were premium-quality Darjeeling teas in all shapes, textures, and flavours, and I realised that my taste buds are in for a treat.

Swarup introduced me to Tshering Sherpa, an ace tea taster in business for over 20 years. The charming middle-aged man, who decides the price of Darjeeling flavours, described the finer aspects of tea tasting. Three sensory perceptions — the sight, smell, and taste — are involved in decoding the grade of teas, he explained, as he led us to the tasting zone. The fact that the taste of tea differs due to climate, soil composition, and rainfall, makes the job of a tea taster even more complex.

Upon arriving at the tasting zone, I noticed a lady setting up samples of freshly plucked teas on a long table. She prepared 30 different samples by pouring hot water from a metallic kettle into ceramic containers with different qualities of loose tea leaves, all produced in this garden. Sherpa mentioned that the leaves need to be soaked for exactly five minutes before the tea is poured into a cup. The ideal temperature for tasting, to get the best flavour, is 40°C, so the tea should be left alone for a while to cool, Sherpa said.

As told, I closely observed the flavours, before sniffing and sipping one cup after the other. There was a bowl of hot water placed at the end of the table to wash off the previous flavour before sipping the next. But before I could finish tasting all of the samples, I had to leave or else I wouldn’t have reached Kurseong in time. I was rueful and all I could say was…“so many teas, so little time”. Swarup knew how much I’d have loved to stay and promised me yet another similar treat in future.

After returning to Kolkata, I got busy with work and life. Months passed by and suddenly on a Sunday morning, the doorbell rang. I found a courier boy at my doorstep, standing with a packet. I was a bit puzzled, as I couldn’t remember ordering anything. But yes, the parcel definitely had my name on it.

As I unwrapped the packet, there emerged a wooden box with the name of the garden I visited embossed on it. The tea sampler gift set, containing five compartments filled with top five loose leaf teas rated by tasters at the end of the tasting session. This was a gift by Swarup who also left a note attached: “Until the next tasting session”.

“Brewing time”, I told myself, but before getting immersed into the heady experience of irresistible flavours and aromas, I called up Swarup to thank him for the loose tea sampler gift set and the invitation for the next tasting event.

Of Glenary’s, Gardens, and Gifts

 

The majestic scenic grandeur of the snow-capped Himalayan peaks, the misty, sleepy tea estates, the British-era toy train that whistles and chugs its way on a zigzag track, make Darjeeling frantically magnetic. It’s hard to name just one thing that I love about this place. Yet, one of my favourite spots during my trips to the ‘Queen of Hills’ has always been Glenary’s, a 1950’s bakery and restaurant that still holds on to its vintage charm. This year, it was even more special.

Moving up the red-carpeted stairway, I headed to the seating area upstairs that offers marvellous views of the valley and mountains. I was waiting for an old friend when the breakfast I ordered was served. The delicious sandwiches and the lemon tart — they tasted just the same for as long as I’ve visited Glenary’s. I can remember my 10 year-old self enjoying these goodies with a generous helping of hot chocolate, which I sometimes traded for the fragrant Darjeeling tea that grown-ups ‘oohed-and-ahhed’ over. But not so easily. “Kids don’t drink tea, tutun” — I was reminded every time I tried coaxing my mother to get me a cup of tea. My college-going older brother, however, was of what was considered a permissible age to order a cup for himself. My good-natured brother would take pity and offer to bribe me some tea under the table…not unless I handed him my lemon tart.

I was lost, deep in thoughts when I was brought back to the present with a tap on my shoulder. It was my friend, Bibek. I was seeing him after three long decades. And, in all these years, he had transformed from a shy Darjeeling boy into a warm and endearing college professor. His crop of greys and silvers flickered in the sunlight and he peeked through his rimless glasses. What didn’t change was the twinkle in his eyes.

Bibek and I met in college when he had come down to Kolkata (then, Calcutta) for higher studies. A friendship that started with exchanging notes grew thicker over the years. Perhaps, my love for tea and Darjeeling played some role in our friendship. On every trip to home, he would always bring back a box of lovely, aromatic Darjeeling tea fresh from the garden, where his father worked as a manager. But he always resisted when my mother offered to make him a cup of the same tea during his evening visits — “That golden brew is for special occasions, for special guests, Mashima. I’m not a guest, am I?”

The only time Bibek accepted a gift from my mother was when he topped his university exams. It was a blue and maroon sweater she had lovingly knitted for him. With winter still some months away, it was a pretty unusual gift for the season — I had joked back then. A week before the first nip in the air arrived that year, my mother passed away. Bibek first wore the sweater during her funeral service.

A particularly memorable time of my life is the summer I spent with Bibek’s family in Darjeeling, following my mother’s death. Her absence gnawed at me, perhaps, the most. Bibek sensed this and literally dragged me with him to Darjeeling. Looking back, that was the best thing he did and I can’t thank him enough.

The tender hospitality and care of his parents coupled with the calming walks through tea gardens and hill treks worked like a restorative potion that helped me heal. Every morning at crack of dawn, I watched the workers making their way to the gardens, picking the young leaves glistening with dew drops as the first rays of the sun peered from behind the mountains. On my last day in the gardens, I was handed a tea gift box set.

The pain of loss wasn’t gone — and will never be — but I emerged out of the darkness, knowing that life must go on. Thereafter, I moved abroad for my research and my contact with Bibek gradually reduced from a couple of phone calls a year to none at all. Six months back, we crossed paths on a social media platform.

Bibek again broke my reverie with a click of his fingers. The golden-orange light of the evening winter sky was descending on the hill slopes, as I looked through the glass windows. He smiled and signalled me to open a packet that he must have slid under my fingers while I was ruminating. A tea selection gift box was unwrapped.

It amazes me how gifts of tea have always arrived to me at such opportune times. But even more amazing is the message that a tea gift box carries: life is worth living, so savour every moment!